Spitzer: The Last Drop

This guy’s been going to prostitutes for a decade?

Jeff Schult comments about the situation at his blog.

What I find so incredible is this guy knew the law. He understood that certain financial transactions automatically trigger alarms put in place ages ago to deal with money laundering. These laws were probably heightened post-9/11. That’s what made him a focus for investigation.

Whether prostitution should or shouldn’t be legal isn’t an issue here.

The sole issue is his judgment.

Did he think he was above the law? Did he have a desire to get caught? Was his need for a certain sexual practice so intense that it overrode all other considerations? For a few moments of selfish pleasure he was willing to betray his wife, his family, destroy his reputation and end his career?

Something plainly screwy was happening in his head. And that’s not the kind of mind I want in charge of my state. He’s not someone I can personally trust.

He should resign.

Rumors are that he will. But if he doesn’t, he should be evicted from office.

Update: In a self-serving statement this morning, he managed to find room to tender his resignation effective Monday, March 17, 2008.

Previously here:

Eliot Spitzer: Closet Crybaby?
Spitzer — or Swallower?
New York State Governor Resigning

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Explore posts in the same categories: C.O.A.T. - Other, C.O.A.T. - Politics, Other, Politics

4 Comments on “Spitzer: The Last Drop”

  1. jposty Says:

    The one thing none of the pundits are addressing is the method the Justice Dept. used to catch Spitzer. They used laws originally designed to catch terrorists or drug dealers in high volume cash trade. The ACLU and civil libertarians are definitely saying “I told you so on this one”.

    All of these anti-terrorism laws seem great until you discover they are turning these tools inward, and now they are being used on private citizens.

    -James
    http://www.thepoliticus.org

  2. mikecane Says:

    Oh, I agree. I’ve resented how those of us who don’t engage in illegality are so many times treated as guilty parties. Here in America, we can’t have currency over $100. While in Europe, they have 500-Euro notes. How is it they can do that while we can’t?

    Don’t even get me started about how they had employers make us prove we’re citizens of our own country because those in charge wouldn’t enforce border controls.

    And then there’s the TSA…

  3. Elizabeth Says:

    I agree with you, Mike. This is an incredible story all around. We could dissect his motivation back and forth, but the bottom line is: He did it, because he could (or so he believed). And now he subjects us to those false-sounding mea culpas, lamenting, among other things, how he disappointed *himself* (huh?).

    My three recurring thoughts when I watch this pathetic spectacle: How stupid. How arrogant. And what else is new.

  4. mikecane Says:

    It makes me wonder: Does he have a secret stash of porn? When did the temptation first enter his mind? Did he do it before he was married? Did something happen to his wife that made mer incapable of sexual activity? There are many, many questions here. I don’t think any of the answers are actually anyone’s business. It’s his violation of the law, after enforcing it for so long, that shows me his judgment is too impaired to lead my state. Something just isn’t right in his head.


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